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Struik Nature

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Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Tuluver: The Hoax Bird Invented to Save the Vulture (Podcast and Video)

Sasol 300 Easy-to-see BirdsSasol 300 maklik sigbare voëls van Suider-Afrika100 Common Bird Calls in East Africa

 
In order to raise awareness about the importance of vultures, and the threat of extinction that they face, BirdLife South Africa recently launched a hoax campaign about a “newly discovered” species: the Tuluver.

The stunt included a video of the fictitious bird, as a way of getting people to pay attention to the “beautiful birds” we are already privileged to have.

BirdLife SA CEO Mark Anderson spoke to Karien Jordaan about the video. He said that although the organisation apologises for causing trouble, the campaign got a huge amount of attention.

Listen to the podcast:

Watch the video about the fictitious Tuluver bird:

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Sylvia Earle Speaks About the Beauty and Importance of the Ocean From 450 Metres Underwater (Video)

South African CoastsAs a world-famous oceanographer and founder of Mission Blue, Sylvia Earle has had many interviews. But for World Oceans Day this year she went above and beyond the norm, or rather below and beyond.

For an interview filmed by Kip Evans, Earle took a trip 450 metres below the ocean’s surface in Undersea Hunter’s DeepSee submersible – a vehicle designed specifically for underwater observation.

Earle spoke about the importance of looking below the surface to understand the ocean fully. She also marvelled at the sheer beauty from the DeepSee submersible: “It’s so blue. I’m trying to describe how many shades of blue; there are no names for most of them.”

Watch the video:

Mission Blue: Beyond Blue from Kip Evans on Vimeo.

 

Gabriela Diaz wrote an article about the significant interview for The Tico Times:

“Most of the ocean is cold and dark. Most of what is known about the ocean is in that upper 1,000 feet or so. You look at a spot on the map and if you only know what’s at the surface you don’t really know what’s going on, any more than you would know about New York City if you just looked at the tops of the buildings. It’s really important to have information about what’s in the deep sea,” said world-renowned oceanographer and explorer Sylvia Earle during an interview shot 1,000 feet underwater at Cocos Island, Costa Rica’s most remote territory located in the Pacific Ocean.

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Flashback Friday: Watch Sylvia Earle’s TED Talk that Changed the World – “How to Protect the Oceans”

South African CoastsSylvia Earle is a renowned oceanographer and arguably one of the greatest advocates for change where matters relating to the ocean are concerned.

In 2009 Earle was one of three people to receive the TED Prize – awarded annually to a leader with a fresh, bold vision for sparking global change. The prize included $1,000,000 to help make the winner’s wish become a reality. What was her wish? Mission Blue:

“I wish you would use all means at your disposal — films! expeditions! the web! new submarines! — to create a campaign to ignite public support for a global network of marine protected areas, Hope Spots large enough to save and restore the blue heart of the planet.”

The wish resulted in the April 2010 Mission Blue TED Conference, organised to draw public attention to ocean protection. Millions of dollars were raised as a result and Mission Blue – The Syvlia Earle Alliance was established.

One of the main projects driven by this organisation is Hope Spots – the identification of special places that are critical to the health of the ocean. The book South African Coasts: A Celebration of Our Seas and Shores serves as a call to create a South African network of Hope Spots, which could also be described as special, people-orientated marine conservation areas.

Watch the TED Talk which started it all, and read the transcript below:

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Fifty years ago, when I began exploring the ocean, no one — not Jacques Perrin, not Jacques Cousteau or Rachel Carson — imagined that we could do anything to harm the ocean by what we put into it or by what we took out of it. It seemed, at that time, to be a sea of Eden, but now we know, and now we are facing paradise lost.

I want to share with you my personal view of changes in the sea that affect all of us, and to consider why it matters that in 50 years, we’ve lost — actually, we’ve taken, we’ve eaten — more than 90 percent of the big fish in the sea; why you should care that nearly half of the coral reefs have disappeared; why a mysterious depletion of oxygen in large areas of the Pacific should concern not only the creatures that are dying, but it really should concern you. It does concern you, as well.

I’m haunted by the thought of what Ray Anderson calls “tomorrow’s child,” asking why we didn’t do something on our watch to save sharks and bluefin tuna and squids and coral reefs and the living ocean while there still was time. Well, now is that time. I hope for your help to explore and protect the wild ocean in ways that will restore the health and, in so doing, secure hope for humankind. Health to the ocean means health for us.

Read an article about the impact of Mission Blue and how Earle’s simple wish – for people to help her protect the ocean – has effected global change:

“Thousands have lived without love; none without water,” said Sylvia Earle as she stood on the TED stage five years ago, accepting the 2009 TED Prize. Wearing a blue blazer and an aura of resolve, Earle quoted this verse from poet W.H. Auden as she laid out a bold wish for the world: that we all wise up to the gravity of human impact on our oceans and recognize that our well-being is dependent on the health of the ocean’s ecosystems.

“Fifty years ago, no one imagined that we could do anything to harm the ocean,” said Earle in her talk. “Now we know we are facing paradise lost.”

These startling words have made a deep impact. After all, they were spoken by a woman whose scientific endeavors and passionate advocacy have earned her an array of titles, from “Her Deepness” (as she’s been called by The New York Times and the New Yorker) to “Joan of Arc of the Ocean” (as she was recently dubbed by director James Cameron).

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Mick Fanning is Grateful for a Miracle, and the Jeffrey’s Bay Shark Wants to Share His Side of the Story (with Video)

The Encyclopedia of SharksWild Seas, Secret ShoresSouth African sharks are under the spotlight this weekend, after Mick Fanning was attacked by a shark in Jeffrey’s Bay this weekend.

Fanning was competing in the finals of a world tour surfing event, when a shark came up to his board in the water and bit his board’s leash.

Martin Parry wrote an article about the attack for the Sunday Times. Read the article:

Australian surf champion Mick Fanning vowed Tuesday to return to the waves after a “miracle” escape from a shark attack, as he paid tribute to courageous mate Julian Wilson for rushing to help.

The 34-year-old three-time world champion fought off a large shark during the final heat of a world tour event at Jeffreys Bay in South Africa on Sunday, with the dramatic scenes beamed live around the world.

He survived unscathed, with rival and close friend Wilson, also from Australia, furiously paddling towards him to help despite the danger posed by the shark, which experts suggested was either a bull or a great white.

Many videos of the attack, showing how Fanning miraculously avoided injury, have been widely viewed on the internet.

Watch this video shared by the World Surf Leaugue:

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On Twitter, an account with the handle @JbayShark has been set up. The account is a humorous endeavour, where the shark says he wants to “tell my side of the story!”

 

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Video: Sylvia Earle Advocates Working with a Vision at the United Nations for World Happiness Day

South African CoastsSylvia Earle, marine biologist and author of South African Coasts: A Celebration of Our Seas and Shores, recently addressed an audience of young people at the United Nations for the International Day of Happiness.

The annual UN event is both a celebration of happiness and a drive to achieve the organisation’s aim of happiness for everyone in the human family.

In her speech, Earle spoke about her great love for the ocean. She says it got her attention when a huge wave knocked her over as a three-year-old, and has held her attention as an explorer because the ocean is alive and keeps us alive.

Earle encourages the children in her audience to have a vision for a happier world, and then work at getting there.

Watch the video:

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Time Magazine Hero of the Planet Sylvia Earle: Changing the World One Hope Spot at a Time (Video)

South African Coasts50/50 recently featured a story on Sylvia Earle, oceanographer and author of South African Coasts: A Celebration of Our Seas and Shores, and her organisation Mission Blue.

The video covers the highlights of Earle’s conservation work. She has achieved a great deal, so much that she was named Hero of the Planet by Time magazine, and Lego made a figurine of her.

Earle is also the founder of the Hope Spots initiative. She explains what a Hope Spot is: a place that is cause for hope because the positive effects of healthy oceans are great and far-reaching.

Watch the video:

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Video: Sylvia Earle Launches Knysna Estuary Mission Blue Hope Spot

South African CoastsSylvia Earle, marine biologist and author of South African Coasts: A Celebration of Our Seas and Shores, recently launched the Knysna Estuary as a Hope Spot.

A Hope Spot is a site that is regarded as critical to the health of the ocean. They are part of Mission Blue, an global initiative by Earle that aims to raise support for the preservation of ocean environments.

Morning Live covered the launch, during which the importance of the preserving the ocean is discussed, and Earle says she would like to imagine a world in which the whole ocean, rather than just 20 percent of it, is treated as a Hope Spot.

Watch the video:

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Video: The Poacher’s Moon, A Short Documentary Film about the Rhino Poaching Scourge

The Poacher's MoonThe Poacher’s Moon by Richard Peirce and Jacqui Peirce tells the true story of Higgins and Lady, two rhinos that survived a brutal attack by poachers. The violent act was further marred by and the shady investigation and suspect circumstances.

Pierce has made a video with Gimme Shelter Films about how the poaching scourge hit Fairy Glen, the private game reserve where Higgins and Lady live.

Watch the video:

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